Additional Listening: Materials Heard and Discussed in Class.

Click on a link:

  1. Angela Brasil, Jeannie Robertson, Mary Ellen Connors, and Thomas Moran (singing one after the other): Edward (The Alan Lomax Collection: Classic Ballads of Britain and Ireland, vol. 1 / 1949-1969)


  2. Cordelia’s Dad: The Sun and the Moon based on “Edward” (Comet, 1995: )


  3. June Tabor’s recording of “The Devil and Bailiff McGlynn” (a song I sang in lecture) was discovered by several students on Rhapsody. Thanks to all who emailed me about it!

  4. John McCormack’s recording of Jeanie with the Light Brown Hair.


“EDWARD” as recorded by Angela Brasil, Jeannie Robertson, Mary Ellen Connors, and Thomas Moran (singing one after the other)

Where have you been now the whole afternoon?
Son come tell it unto me!
I was fishin’ and a fowlin’ the whole day long
By mother’s perjury!

What brought the blood upon your right shoulder dear?
Son come tell it unto me!
It’s the blood of the hare I killed today,
And I killed most manfully.

The blood of the hare, it would never be so red!
Son come tell it unto me!
It’s the killing of the boy that I killed today,
And I killed most manfully.

What come between nah yourself and the boy?
Son come tell it unto me!
It was mostly the courtin’ of a rod
That would never come a tree.

***

Oh what’s the blood that’s on your sword?
My son David, ho son David!
What’s that blood — it’s on your sword?
Come promise, tell me true.

Oh that’s the blood of my grey mare,
Hi lady mother, ho lady mother!
That’s the blood of my grey mare,
Because she would ne’er o’er by me.

Oh that blood, it is howe’er clear!
My son David, ho son David!
That blood, it is howe’er clear!
Come promise, tell me true.

Oh that’s the blood of my grey hound,
Hi lady mother, ho lady mother!
That’s the blood of my grey hound,
Because it would ne’re o’er by me.

Oh that blood, it is howe’er clear!
My son David, ho son David!
Oh that blood, it is howe’er clear!
Come promise, tell me true.

Oh that’s the blood of my brother John,
Hi lady mother, ho lady mother!
That’s the blood of my brother John,
Because it would ne’re o’er by me.

***

And what will you do when your father comes home?
Dear son come tell to me?
I’ll place my foot on yon shipboard
And I’ll sail to some foreign country.

And what will you do with your pretty little wife?
Dear son come tell to me?
She’ll place her foot on yon shipboard
And sail along with me.

And what will you do with your two pretty babes?
Dear son come tell to me?
I’ll give one to my father and the other to my mother
And they’ll keep them company

And what will you do with your preciouf (?) hounds?
Dear son come tell to me?
I’ll loose the straps from ‘round their necks
Y’and they’ll hunt the more for me.

***

What will you do with your two fine children?
Son come tell it unto me?
I’ll give one to my father and the other to my mother,
To keep them company.

What will you do with your lovely wife?
Son come tell it unto me?
I’ll dress her up in a jolly sailor suit,
And she’ll sail on board with me.

Oh son, oh son, when will you return
Son come tell it unto me?
When the moon and the sun will both shine as one
And that’s what you never will see. [speaks: “That’s it all!”]

“THE SUN AND THE MOON,” (Edward, as interpreted by Cordelia’s Dad)

How come that blood all over your shirt
My son come tell unto me!
It is the blood of my gallant grey hawk,
Who flies across the fields.

Your gallant grey hawk’s blood was never so red
My son come tell unto me!
It is the blood of my gallant grey hound,
Who hunts the fields with me.

Your gallant grey hound’s blood was never so red
My son come tell unto me!
It is the blood of my gallant grey mare,
I used to ride so gay.

Your gallant grey mare’s blood was never so red
My son come tell unto me!
It is the blood of my own dear brother
Whom lately I have slain.

What’d you and him fall out about
My son come tell unto me!
About cutting down yon’ hazelnut tree
Is what caused it for to be.

What’ya gonna do when your daddy finds out?
My son come tell unto me!
I’ll set my foot in yonder ship
And I’ll sail across the sea.

What’ya gonna do with your pretty little wife?
My son come tell unto me!
She’ll set her foot in yonder ship
And she’ll sail away with me.

And what’ya gonna do with your children three?
My son come tell unto me!
I’ll leave them here along with you
To bear you company

And when ya comin’ home?
My son come tell unto me!
When the sun and the moon sets in the north hills
And that will never be.

THE DEVIL and BAILIFF MCGLYNN, as sung by Ben

(June Tabor’s version, you’ll hear, replaces the “red necks” below with “blackness” — implying perhaps that dark skin equates to inferiority or evil.)

As a young man one fine summer evening I strayed down along by the sea
When a pair of quaire playboys arovin’ before me I happened to see
Now to know what these boyos were up to, I tried for to hasten me walk
For I thought I could learn their professions if I got within range of their talk

Now the one of these fiends was the devil and the other was Bailiff McGlynn
And they’s necks was as red as each others, so’as the both was as ugly as sin
Said the old boy now “aye! speak o’ the devil!” “And thou art the bailiff I see!”
“‘Tis the devil himself!” cried the bailiff… “Now that beats the devil!” says he.

A gossoon ran out from a cottage and took him up over the fields.
“Let the devil ha’ thee,” said his brother, as he rattled a stone at his heels
“Ah now, why don’t you take the young rascal. Your highness?” the bailiff he cried
“It was not from his heart that he said it” Baealzebub smiling replied.

Now close by a small patch of potatoes, a banbh was striving to dig
When the owner come out with a hatchet “Bring the devil on you as a pig!”
Said the bailiff, “Now that’s a fine offer why not take the banbh?” says he
“Ah ‘twas was but with her lips that she said it, and that’s not sufficient for me”

As they jogged on, I soon espyed ‘em as straight to his mother they sped
Crying “Mother!” says he, with surprise as she clasped her two hands and she said
“May the devil take ya dear old bailiff!” said the dark prince, “Bedad! That’ll do!
It war straight from her heart that she said it, so Bailiff McGlynn, I’ll take you.”


JEANIE with the LIGHT BROWN HAIR

I dream of Jeanie with the light brown hair
Borne like a vapor on the summer air
I see her tripping where the bright streams play
Happy as the daisies that dance on her way.
Many were the wild notes her merry voice would pour,
Many were the blithe birds that warbled them o’er.
I dream of Jeanie with the light brown hair
Floating like a vapor on the soft, summer air.

I sigh for Jeannie, but her light form strayed
Far from the fond parts round her native glade;
Her smiles have vanished and her sweet songs flown
Flitting like the dreams that have cheered us and gone.
Now the nodding wild flow’rs may wither on the shore,
While her gentle fingers will cull them no more;
I dream of Jeanie with the light brown hair
Floating like a vapor on the soft, summer air.