Monday
Sep272010

Calendar Overview

>>> FINAL EXAM INFORMATION <<<

Week 1: Sept 28, Oct 1, 3 & 5

Basic Voice Leading:

Oct 1: George Marsh Rhythm Workshop

Oct 3-5: Types of Motion and Voicing, Guidelines for Unity and Motion

Keyboard Skills (Weeks 1 and 2: Due M-Tu Oct 1-2 AND Oct 8-9 in labs), Voice & Rhythm (WEEK 1: Due W-F Oct 3-5 in labs)

Read Kostka & Payne Chapter 5 (all) & Chapter 6 (pp 85-91) 

Complete Self-Tests 5-2 A & C, 5-3 B & D (Due Oct 3)

Assignment 1: Melody and Root-position voice-leading (Due Oct 8)

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Week 2: Oct 8, 10, 12

Harmonic Progression

 Keyboard skills (See above for the portion due Mon Oct 8 & Tu Oct 9) Voice & Rhythm (Due Wed-Fr Oct 10-12).

Read Kostka & Payne Chapter 6 (pp 91-98) & 7 (all)

Assignment 2:  Root-position voice-leading pt 2 (Due Oct 12)

***

Week 3: Oct 15, 17, 19

Oct 15: George Marsh Rhythm Workshop

First Inversion Triads

Keyboard skills (Due Mon Oct 15 & Tu Oct 16) Voice & Rhythm (Due Wed-Fri Oct 17-19), 

Read Kostka & Payne Chapter 8 & 9 

Assignment 3 (Due Oct 24)

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Week 4: Oct 22, 24, 26

Mid-term review (take home test October 26)

Keyboard skills (Due Mon Oct 22 & Tu Oct 23)  Voice & Rhythm (Due Wed-Fri Oct 24-26)

 

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Week 5: Oct 29, 31, Nov 2

Oct 29: George Marsh Rhythm Workshop

Keyboard Skills (Mon Oct 29 & Tues Oct 30)  Voice & Rhythm (Due Wed Oct 31—Fri Nov 2),

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Week 6: Nov 5, 7, 9

November 5: George Marsh Rhythm Workshop

Using non-chord tones: N, P, App, and E.

READING: Baroque counterpoint 2:1 (Kent Kennan Chapter 4 excerpt); Kostka & Payne Chapter 9.

Assignment 5 (given in class, based on Minuet in Dm and Minuet in Gm from the Anna Magdalena Bach Notebook), due Wednesday November 7: Analyze the harmony of the first 8 bars of both Minuets. Re-compose a right-hand melodic part above the existing left-hand part.

Mid-term: Keyboard Skills (Monday Nov 5 & Tues Nov 6), Mid-term: Voice & Rhythm (Wed Nov 7—Fri Nov 9)

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Week 7: Nov 12, 14, 16

Basics of cadences, non-chord tones, continued: Suspensions.

Assignment 6 [Due Friday, Nov 16]:

1. From Xs marked on your midterms (each worth 3 points), submit corrections on separate staff paper. Each successful correction based on an X is worth 2 points. Corrections of errors that were not marked are worth 4 points.

2. Each day this week, listen to selections from one of the videos linked in Listening Assignment 1

3. Read my guidelines (also given in lecture) on 2-part writing in the 18th-c style. Complete the four counterpoint exercises given in class on Friday November 9.

Keyboard Skills (Mon 11/19!-Tues 11/20! — NOTE: no keyboard labs 11/12-11/13)

Voice & Rhythm (Wed 11/14-Fri 11/16)

Read Kennan on 3:1 & 4:1

***

Week 8: Nov 19, 21

Non-chord tones, continued: Suspensions, retardations, anticipations. 6-3 & 6-4 idioms and cadential formulae.

Read Kostka & Payne Chapter 10.

***

Week 9: Nov 26, 28, 30

November 26: George Marsh Rhythm Workshop

Cadential formulae, continued. Antecedent and consequent phrases.

(BASED ON LAST WEEK, but DIFFERENT KEYS —>) Keyboard Skills (November 26-27)

(THIS V&R ASSIGNMENT INCLUDES THE FANCY FIGURED BASS—>) Voice & Rhythm (November 28-30)

Due November 28: Assignment 6 revisions [extended 2 days]

Due November 30: Minuet plan—

1. [TURN IN–p 1 of the handout given in class:] Analyze the cadences in (a) Nel Cor Piu Non Mi Sento (as begun in class) or

(b) one of the Minuets studied so far this quarter. Recognize the overall length of each of these two compositions, and at what time interval (in measures) the cadences occur.

2. [NOT TO TURN IN—p 2 of the handout:] Choose one of these analyses, and following the Corelli example given in class, write (a) a bass and treble note corresponding to the beginning of each phrase, (b) bass and treble notes corresponding to the chords in each cadence, and (c) a series of bass notes corresponding to each sequence.

3. TURN IN—p 3 of the handout: A transposition of your analysis in step 2. 

***

Week 10: Dec 3, 5, 7

Read Ellis Koss “The Melodic Phrase”. 

Assignment 7: Idiomatic 3:1, 4:1, and Suspension Exercises [Due Wednesday, December 5]

Final Projects (Due at the beginning of the final exam).

Labs: Keyboard Skills Final, Voice and Rhythm Final.

FINAL EXAM


Monday
Sep272010

Week 1 & 2 Keyboard Skills (*two* Monday-Tuesday deadlines)

Due Monday/Tuesday, Oct 1-2

Prepared Interpretation:

Learn example 5-8 (Kostka & Payne p 78), playing all four voices at the keyboard while singing one voice. (Choose the one most comfortable for your voice range.) 

Due Monday/Tuesday, Oct 8-9

Scales:  

B minor, G minor. Ascend melodic minor, descend natural minor. Two octaves each direction.

Pace = no lower than q = 52 (with each note a quarter). Pick any tempo you like above that — pianists consider hallenging yourselves to play smoothly at 100-110. However, the exercise earns no credit if more than one error is made, or any pause is introduced in your rhythm.

Chord Progression:

I    I6   IV   V   I

Keys: G major, F major, and A minor (in minor, play: i i6 iv V i). Learn to play this progression smoothly, with one note in the bass and 3 in the right hand. Avoid changing the position of the right hand radically. Instead, shift the “inversion” of the right-hand triad so that voices maintain roughly the same register throughout the progression. Explore different ways of accomplishing this. (Note that “inversion” is quotes; the chord inversion is of course determined by the note you play with your left hand.)

Wednesday
Dec012010

Final Exam

Here’s when it is:

12/12/12 at 12:00.

And here’s what’s on it:

1. 30 pts — 4 part writing:

a. Short Exercises: like Kostka & Payne Self Tests 9-1 B & C; 8-1 C #s 7-12.

b. Figured bass realization: practice adding tenor, alto, and soprano to the figured bass examples from keyboard lab exercises from week 4, week 5, the midterm, and final.

2. 15 pts — Aural Skills: eCommons Units 5-8, & 11: full progressions (major and minor) and short “figured melodies.”

3. 30 pts — 3 short counterpoint exercises: One of them will require 3:1 or 4:1 writing. Practice by writing new counterpoints above the bass lines of the three new Corelli & Bach Minuets given in class last week and this week. Also re-do assignments 6 & 7, transposing exercises to new keys to encourage fresh thinking. 

—> Remember that the quickest and clearest way to write counterpoint is to begin with a sense of the harmony that should be implied…not just over a particular note, but over small groups of 2-4 notes. Then write a scale or arpeggio that forms a simple shape crossing toward the next strong beat. Once you’ve written that lightly on your exam, proofread to check whether it meets the 2:1 writing guidelines. If you’ve started with a good shape and good harmony, correcting “errors” tends to be easier than if you’ve written a jumble of note-to-note intervals.

4. 25 pts — Analysis: Identify harmony, cadences, & NCTs, in a short 2-part minuet, march, or aria. Practice with the additional minuets given in class last week.

Study Tip:

Download assignment worksheets that you feel were particularly difficult for you. Transpose 2-3 exercises on each sheet into a new key, and write them from a fresh perspective, using all of your recently improved confidence and knowledge. If you begin this process and after 5 minutes, it’s fun, do not be afraid. Be in the now; confess your love, and live for it…

Friday
Sep282012

Week 1 Voice and Rhythm (Due W-Th-Fr Oct 3-5)

Prepared Singing:

Ottman #346, 374 (Excerpts taken from previous edition)

Singing Drills:

(1) Interval Naming Drill - In the key of C, sing pairs of notes, lower first and then upper, beginning with pairs 1 step apart. Sing each pair twice in quick succession. First sing the pair using their note names, e.g. “E, F”; then sing the same pair while reciting the quality and size of the interval between them. (Sing the quality for the first note, and the size for the second.) Move quickly to a pair of notes with the same starting note, but a second note one step higher. It will sound like this: “E, F, minor, second, E, G, minor, third, E, A, perfect, fourth, E, B, perfect, fifth…” etc. Be prepared to begin on any step interval in the C major scale, with the second note ascending until it reaches the seventh.

(2) Basic Ear Preparation – practice this two or three times a day—for not more than three minutes each time. The following explanation and example refers to the tonality of C.

a. Using a keyboard or other instrument, play a short C and immediately sing ‘C’. 

b. Play C notes in different octaves, after each one respond by singing it in whatever range is comfortable for you.

c. Do the same with G. Again, play G notes in as many octaves as your instrument allows, but respond by singing the same comfortable G.

d. Now play both C and G notes and respond accordingly. Try surprising directions and sizes of leaps. When your spontaneous keyboard notes leap considerably, try singing your responses close together, and vice versa. When your keyboard notes create a rising contour, try singing your responses in a descending contour, and vice versa.

e. Very gradually add notes from the C-major scale, in the following order: E, A, F, D, and B.

Wednesday
Oct032012

Week 2 Voice and Rhythm (Due Wed 10/10—Fri 10/12)

Prepared Singing

Ottman #347, 375 (Excerpts taken from previous edition)

Singing Drills

(1) Interval naming drills (see last week’s assignment): key of D and A-flat. Be sure to name accidentals correctly (e.g. “F#” and “C#” in D) when those notes come into play. (Do not call them “F” and “C.”)

Be prepared to begin on any step interval in the D major scale (as before, the second note of each pair will be one note higher than the second note of the previous pair).

(2) Basic Ear Preparation – practice this two or three times a day—for not more than three minutes each time. The following explanation and example refers to the tonality of D minor.

a. Using a keyboard or other instrument, play a short D and immediately sing ‘D’. 

b. Play D notes in different octaves, after each one respond by singing it in whatever range is comfortable for you.

c. Do the same with A. Again, play A notes in as many octaves as your instrument allows, but respond by singing the same comfortable A.

d. Now play both D and A notes and respond accordingly. Try surprising directions and sizes of leaps. When your spontaneous keyboard notes leap considerably, try singing your responses close together, and vice versa. When your keyboard notes create a rising contour, try singing your responses in a descending contour, and vice versa.

e. Very gradually add notes from the D minor scale, in the following order: F, G, E, Bb,.

f. Sing “B” on the note B-natural, and hold it for a relatively long time. Then find a leading tone (C#) in a different octave.

g. Sing “C” on the note C, and hold it for a relatively long time. Then sing Bb in a different octave.

h. Repeat f & g above, but in the case of f, continue from your leading tone up a half step to D. In the case of g, continue from your Bb down a half step to A.

Friday
Oct052012

Week 3 Keyboard Skills (Due Mon 10/15—Tues 10/16)

Scales:  

C minor, D minor. Ascend melodic minor, descend natural minor. Two octaves each direction. Use our fingering chart when in doubt!

Pace = no lower than q = 52 (with each note a quarter). Pick any tempo you like above that — pianists consider hallenging yourselves to play smoothly at 100-110. However, the exercise earns no credit if more than one error is made, or any pause is introduced in your rhythm.

Chord Progression

I6    I64   IV6   V   I64

Keys: G major, B major, and D minor (in minor, play minor triads except V).

As before, learn to play these progressions smoothly, with one note in the bass and 3-4 in the right hand. Do not change the position of the right hand radically; rather shift the “inversion” of the right-hand triad so that voices maintain roughly the same register throughout the progression. (Note that “inversion” is quotes; the chord inversion is of course determined by the note you play with your left hand.)

Prepared Interpretation

Transpose Kostka & Payne Example 7-1, mm 1-4 into E-major. Write it clearly, and plan the fingerings of each chord. Choose two of the four voices to learn to sing while playing.

Friday
Oct052012

Week 3 Voice & Rhythm (Due Wed 10/17—Fri 10/19)

Prepared Singing

Ottman #345, 373 (Excerpts taken from previous edition)

Singing Drills

Arpeggio Progression #1, in Bb and G. Use movable do. 

- Interval naming drills (see last week’s assignment): keys of A and Db major.

Be prepared to begin on any step interval in the A and Db major scales (as before, the second note of each pair will be one note higher than the second note of the previous pair).

Sight-singing

Sing through these practice melodies (sheet 1 & sheet 2), two per day, concentrating on them as practice for sight-singing. Examine the meter and learn the rhythms quickly by looking at the notation, then quickly hum the scale degrees in the melody’s tonality. Finally, look at any unusual leaps, and internalize the feeling of singing those particular sounds. After about 30 seconds of preparation in this manner, begin to sing the melody slowly. Do this twice per day, using these practice melodies, and other melodies in your repertoire as an instrumentalist or singer. (If you are a singer, sing fragments of melody from the bass line and other figures in the your accompanists’ lines.) You will be asked to sing a melody resembling those sheet 1, that you haven’t seen before; you’ll be given about 30 seconds to prepare it.

Friday
Oct122012

Week 4 Keyboard Skills (Due Mon-Tues 10/22-23)

Scales: 

(1) Rhythmic scale. See this worksheet for the performance rhythm in 3/4: eighth- quarter -eighth, two eighths, in sequence. A major, two octaves ascending & descending in parallel motion.

(2) Spreading and converging motion. G minor. Two octaves ascending (melodic) & descending (natural) in contrary motion.

As before, the pace should no lower than q = 52 (with each note a quarter). Pick any tempo you like above that. Pianists: consider challenging yourselves to play smoothly at 100-110. However, the exercise earns no credit if more than one error is made, or any pause is introduced in your rhythm.

(3)  Chord progression: Figured bass 1 (JA).

Prepared Interpretation

Learn to play to the downbeat of m 8 of J.S. Bach’s “Marche” in D major from the A.M.B. Notebook, at a steady tempo. (You do not need to play the “tr”—trill—in m 7.) For discussion in your section meeting, analyze the harmony and identify non-chord tones not already labeled. Does your analysis of the harmonic progression affect your interpretation of the work? If so, how? In labs, a perfect score will reflect some sensitivity to the harmony, and the cadence.

Friday
Oct122012

Week 4 Voice & Rhythm (Due Wed-Fri 10/24-26)

Prepared Singing

Ottman: 8.14, 8.19

 Singing Drills:

 - Arpeggio Progression #1. This week, sing it in a minor key suitable to your voice range. The score linked here presents the figure in Bb major, so you will need to determine the correct notes and syllables associated with the minor mode, including the leading tone in m 4.

 - Interval naming drills (descending!): key of Eb and G.

Be prepared to begin on any step interval in these scale. However, in constrast with the previous assignment, the second note of each pair will be one note lower than the second note of the previous pair.

Friday
Oct192012

Week 5 Keyboard Skills (Due Mon Oct 29—Tues Oct 30)

Scales: 

(1) Rhythmic scale. See this worksheet for the performance rhythm. E and F two octaves ascending & descending in parallel motion.

(2) Spreading and converging motion. C minor and B minor. Two octaves ascending & descending in contrary motion (melodic and natural).

As before, the pace should no slower than q = 52 (with each note a quarter). Pick any tempo you like above that. Pianists: consider challenging yourselves to play smoothly at 100-110. However, the exercise earns no credit if more than one error is made, or any pause is introduced in your rhythm.

(3) Figured Bass (ATC)

Prepared Interpretation

Following guidelines given last week for the March in D, learn the first 8 mm of the antecedent sentence in J.S. Bach’s Minuet in G major from the A.M.B. Notebook, at a steady tempo. Write fingerings in whereever your choices deviate from those written on the page.

Friday
Oct192012

Week 5 Voice & Rhythm (Due Wed 10/31—Fri 11/2)

Prepared Singing

Ottman: 6.50, 7.28

Singing Drills:

 - Sung Chords Drill. Given a bass note c, d, f, g, or a, sing triads 53 (root position) in major, then minor, 6  (1st inversion) in major then minor, 64 (2nd inversion) in major, then minor, and an augmented triad. Sing each chord type as an arpeggio up and down through the three basic notes of the chord, using note names (including accidentals) as the syllables being sung.

(Just to confirm: The sequence of notes sung, assuming the bass is the tonic, will be {1, ^3 (major third), 5, ^3, 1, v3 (minor third), 5, v3, 1, v3 v6 v3 1, ^3, ^6, ^3, 1, ^3, a5 (augmented fifth), ^3, 1}, but each of those scale-degrees should be sung as its corresponding letter name.)

 - Interval naming drills 1 (descending!): key of E and Bb. + NEW: Be prepared to sing any diatonic interval, from any starting note w/o the context of a key.

 — Sight-singing. We have a new sight-singing resource in a free online book titled “Melodia.” We’ll use it primarily for extra sight-singing practice materials. This week, sightsing examples 9a-11 (p 41), 59-61 (p 45), and 95-97 (p 48). Your quiz will be similar to these.

Also feel free to use examples drawn at random from the first five sections of your sight-singing workbook (Ottman).

Monday
Oct292012

Keyboard Skills Midterm, November 5 & 6

1. Perform the exposition of Bach’s Minuet in G as last week, but with exceptionally steady and assured tempo, and confident interpretation.

[Extra credit: play the repeat, and add ornamentation or otherwise adjust your performance. If your adjustment is subtle (a different approach to dynamics or slightly fluctuating tempo, for example), then be prepared to explain your interpretation verbally.]

2. Figured Bass (JL)

3. SCALES (suggested fingerings):

Rhythmic scales in parallel motion: F major and B major, with this rhythm:

Scales in spreading and converging motion: F minor and E minor.